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One offspring and four releases

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The month of June was a very happy one for our Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme. Four young orangutans are ready for freedom and are undergoing final training at the Advanced Forest School in Jantho. Among them is an old acquaintance. And someone else showed up at the Reintroduction Station with a happy surprise after years of absence.

One offspring and four releases

-
The month of June was a very happy one for our Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme. Four young orangutans are ready for freedom and are undergoing final training at the Advanced Forest School in Jantho. Among them is an old acquaintance. And someone else showed up at the Reintroduction Station with a happy surprise after years of absence.

Six years ago, we reported on the sad story of «No Nose». The female orangutan, actually called Bina Wana, came to our Quarantine and Rehabilitation Centre as a baby, only a few months old. Its mother had been killed by poachers. In the unequal fight, the poachers had also cut off Bina Wana’s nose with a machete. Hence her unofficial name «No Nose».

2016: Bina Wana as a baby in our Quarantine and Rehabilitation Centre

But the little orangutan recovered despite this severe injury and was prepared for a new life in freedom at our Quarantine and Rehabilitation Centre. And now, 7 years after she was brought to us seriously injured, she is ready for her new beginning. Together with her «colleagues» Rori, Bumi and Lembang, she is receiving the finishing touches for release at the Jantho Reintroduction Station.

2022: Bina Wana as an adult orangutan shortly before her release into the wild
Transport to freedom

In addition, our team in Jantho observed a female orangutan with a baby near the Reintroduction Station. It was Kluet, who had been freed from illegal captivity at the age of four and was released by us in Jantho in 2019. For us, it is always a very special moment of joy when orangutans released by us are spotted with their offspring. This is not only because it is very fascinating to observe orangutan mothers interacting with their young, but because each one of them is proof that we have once again come a step closer to our goal of establishing new populations in the protected rainforest.

Kluet with her offspring
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